Archive for November, 2008

Types of yEnc Decoders

Monday, November 24th, 2008

There are three types of yEnc Decoder.  There is the manual yEnc Decoder, automatic yEnc Decoder, and the native yEnc Decoder.

Native yEnc Decoder

The native yEnc Decoder is the one that is built into your software.  If your newsreader has yEnc Decoder support, this means that your application provides native yEnc Decoder support.

The Forte Agent newsreader is a native yEnc Decoder.

Manual yEnc Decoder

If your newsreader does not offer yEnc Decoder support natively, like Outlook Express, Mozilla Thunderbird, or Opera, you will need third party software that provides yEnc Decoder functionality. A manual yEnc Decoder allows you to copy and paste, or save your news messages as text, and convert the yEnc messages into binaries.  This is a manual process.  yEnc32 is a manual yEnc Decoder.

Automatic yEnc Decoder

An automatic yEnc Decoder is also a third party software that you use when your newsreader does not have a yEnc Decoder feature. There are many types of automatic yEnc Decoders.  There are application specific plugin, and there are generic plugins like yProxy Pro that works with any newsreader.

An automatic yEnc Decoder such as yProxy Pro only has to be setup or configured once, then it automatically decodes yEnc attachments for your newsreader.

My first reimpression of TigerDirect.com

Wednesday, November 19th, 2008

Time to order

It’s time to get a new computer system.  My current system has reached its limit of upgrade-ability.  I can’t even watch streaming HD video over the Internet.  I need a faster processor and/or a faster graphics card.

My 5 year old motherboard has an AGP slot, whereas, in order to upgrade the video card, I need a PCI Express slot.  This forces me to purchase a new motherboard, and therefore a new CPU and RAM, and even new hard drives (they’re all SATA nowadays, not IDE).  So, rather than put everything in my existing case, and having my old motherboard, CPU, RAM, and hard drives collect dust, I’m buying a new case to build a second system.  The old system will be given to my wife after a clean reinstall of the OS.

The NewEgg debacle

newegglogoSo, I load up my shopping cart at NewEgg.com.  They have tons of rebates, so the price is looking good.  I apply for the finance option (0 percent for 12 months) so I can pay it off over at least a couple months.  I get turned down.  Twice.  Reason: supposedly, they’re “unable to verify” my information.  That answer is so vague and could be used for any reason to deny a person credit.

So, I’m forced to use my credit card, and when I click submit, the order seems to go through.  I log in later, only to find that my order’s status is “void”.  I call NewEgg about this, and in the mean time, they block my account entirely, so I can’t even log in.

Apparently, somebody had fraudulently used my credit card on a different NewEgg account, but this was two years ago.  They caught the fraud and blocked it.  Then, when I tried to use the credit card, it raised a red flag, and my account got blocked.  It took me four days and three phone calls to get this straightened out so that I could use a different credit card to place an order.

Comparison shopping

In the meantime, while I was waiting for NewEgg to unfoul my account, I had time to price compare the new system at a few competitors, with TigerDirect being one of them.  As it turns out, Mwave.com, TigerDirect.com, and NewEgg.com were all within $10 of each other for total cost after shipping.

I still wanted to use NewEgg for most of my order because they seem to have a more extensive rebate program–there were more mail in rebates if I went through NewEgg.

Ordering from TigerDirect.com

The price was lower at TigerDirect.com for the graphics card, regardless of rebate.  So, I ordered the card from TigerDirect.  There was also a $1.99 shipping sale on that item, so I had it shipped to me for only $1.99 via ground (supposedly 5-7 business days).  As it turns out, TigerDirect has a warehouse in Illinois, and that $1.99 5-7 business day ground shipping got me the graphics card the next day.

I’m still waiting for NewEgg.com to process my order.

I probably haven’t ordered from TigerDirect.com in over 10 years. They’ve been around for a lot longer than NewEgg.com.  I made the switch to NewEgg.com thanks to NewEgg’s often cheaper and speedier shipping methods and decent return policy.  However, as time has gone by, NewEgg.com has tightened their policies.  If you’re a die hard NewEgg.com shopper, and you haven’t done so yet, it’s time to re-evaluate them.

Comparing NewEgg.com and TigerDirect.com

NewEgg.com’s return policies are now very strict, especially regarding video cards and CPUs.  TigerDirect.com’s return policy is still 30 days on everything.

NewEgg.com does NOT do price protection.  TigerDirect.com will give you store credit for the difference if any item you purchase lowers in price within 30 days after the purchase (except for CPUs and RAM, and things that include CPUs and RAM, such as desktops, bundles, etc.).

TigerDirect.com apparently has multiple warehouses, so you’ll very likely get speedy deliveries on most items, even without paying for 2 or 3 day shipping.  NewEgg.com charges for 2 or 3 days shipping on everything, even if the closest warehouse is down the street.

TigerDirect.com is back

It’s been awhile since I ordered from TigerDirect.com, but I think, after this new purchase from them, and this first reimpression, they’ve won me back.